Information for 2014 to 2015


 

Accounting

ACC 201  Introduction to Financial Accounting

Introduction to accounting theory and methods used to record and report financial information according to generally accepted accounting principles. (3 hours lecture).

ACC 202  Introduction to Managerial Accounting

Introduction to practices and procedures used to report internal operations to management. Topics include manufacturing operations, budgeting, standard costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, job and process costing, statement of cash flows, and financial statement analysis. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): ACC 201 with a grade of “C” or better or equivalent or consent of instructor.

 

Agriculture

AG 20  Plant Science

The study of plant morphology, anatomy, physiology, classification, growth, growth regulators, and propagation. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory).

AG 93V  Cooperative Education

This course provides college credit for compensated work experience to reinforce knowledge and skills learned in coursework for the Agricultural Technology Program. Related instruction may be provided as appropriate. Seventy-five hours of work per semester is required for each credit earned. Repeatable to a total of 4 credits that may be applied to the AA degree, 1 credit applicable toward Certificate of Completion.

Pre-requisite(s): Open to Agriculture majors only. Instructor’s permission is required.

AG 120  Plant Science

The study of plant science, morphology, anatomy, physiology classification, growth, growth regulators, and propagation. Students are required to write a 10 to 15 page research report. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lecture/lab).

DB

AG 132  Integrated Pest Management

Strategies of integrated pest mangement; biological and cultural pest controls, weed control, disease control, insect control. (3 hours lecture).

AG 149  Plant Propagation

Introduction to the principles and practices of propagation of fruit, vegetable, and ornamental crops by seed, cuttings, grafting, budding, layering and division. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: 12th Grade reading level.

AG 152  Orchid Culture

An extensive study of orchid identification, breeding, growth, and culture. Students are required to write a 10 to 15 page research report. (3 hours lecture).

AG 235  Irrigation Principles and Design

Fundamentals of irrigation principles, plant, soil, water relationships, soil moisture sensing devices, delivery systems, set up of drip, sprinkler, and surface irrigation systems. Use of chemigation. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: Math 22 or higher.

 

Animal Sciences

ANSC 140  Introduction to Veterinary Technology

This course introduces students to the field of veterinary technology and describes the responsibilities and expectations for students enrolled in the program. Topics include: roles of the veterinary team members, legal and ethical aspects of veterinary practice, breeds of companion animals, safety, sanitation and waste-disposal protocols, and career fields in veterinary medicine. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in ANSC 142 and ANSC 142L

ANSC 142  Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals

Introduction to the anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. Compares the anatomy and function of major body systems for the cat, dog and horse, with lesser emphasis on birds, reptiles and amphibians. This course is intended for students entering veterinary technology, veterinary assisting or other animal-related fields. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in ANSC 140 and ANSC 142L.

DB

ANSC 142L  Anatomy of Domestic Animals Laboratory

Laboratory to accompany ANSC 142. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the body systems of common domestic species (e.g., cats, dogs, horses and birds) through dissections, examinations of models, laboratory exercises, and other hands-on activities. This course is intended for students entering veterinary technology, veterinary assisting or other animal-related fields. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in ANSC 140 and ANSC 142.

DY

ANSC 151  Clinical Laboratory Techniques

Provides students with the background knowledge needed to perform and interpret laboratory techniques commonly used in veterinary practice. Topics include: Homeostatic relationships, cytology, histology, parisitology and clinical physiology of major body systems. Includes a discussion of common disorders affecting major body systems and the techniques used for diagnosis. This course is intended for students entering veterinary technology, veterinary assisting or other animal-related fields. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): A grade of "C" or better in ANSC 142 and 142L.

Co-requisite(s): Registration in ANSC 151L.

DB

ANSC 151L  Clinical Laboratory Techniques Lab

Laboratory to accompany ANSC 151. Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform common veterinary lab tests including urinalysis, hematology, blood chemistry, cytology and parasitology. This course is intended for students entering veterinary technology, veterinary assisting or other animal-related fields. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ANSC 142 and 142L, credit for or registration in ANSC 151.

DY

ANSC 152  Companion Animal Diseases and Nutrition

An introduction to the husbandry and medical care of companion animals. Topics include canine and feline life cycles (including breeding, pregnancy and parturition), housing and nutritional needs, exam procedures and medical recording, nursing and wound management, and identification and treatment of common diseases. This course is intended for students entering veterinary technology, veterinary assisting, or other animal-related fields. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): A grade of "C" or better for ANSC 142 and ANSC 142L.

Co-requisite(s): Registration in ANSC 152L.

ANSC 253  Applied Pharmacology for Veterinary Technicians

This course is designed to give students a practical knowledge of drugs used in veterinary medicine. Topics include drug classification, methods of action, calculations, administration, effects and side effects. Also includes a discussion of client education, drug safety, and federal regulations governing the purchase and storage of controlled drugs. Upon successful completion, students will be able to properly calculate, dispense, and administer medications, recognize adverse reactions and maintain pharmaceutical inventory and administrative records. This course is intended for students entering veterinary technology, veterinary assisting, or other animal-related fields. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in ANSC 151 and 151L, MATH 101 and HLTH 125.

ANSC 258  Clinical Laboratory Techniques II

A continuation of ANSC 151& 151L, this course provides students with additional instruction and hands-on experience with laboratory tests commonly used in veterinary practice. Topics include: 1) identification of internal parasites 2) performance and evaluation of microbiologic and serologic tests, 3) collection & evaluation of cytological samples 4) veterinary necropsy procedures. Included in this course is a review of the anatomy and physiology of major body systems and an overview of common diseases seen in veterinary practice. This course is intended for students entering veterinary assisting, veterinary technology or other animal-related fields. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in ANSC 151, 151L, 152, and 152L.

Co-requisite(s): None

ANSC 261  Anesthesiology & Surgical Nursing for Veterinary Technicians

This course will focus on dental anatomy, common dental diseases, and basic dental procedures. Topics will include proper charting, routine periodontal care, anesthesia, patient monitoring, analgesia, post-op concerns, and home care for clients. Dental equipment and instruments will be reviewed in preparation for the concurrent lab (ANSC 261L). (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Admission into the Veterinary Technology program.

Co-requisite(s): Co-registration in ANSC 261L.

DB

ANSC 261L  Anesthesiology and Veterinary Dentistry for Veterinary Technicians Lab

This course will focus on the clinical skills necessary for safe and effective anesthesia and dental prophylaxis of companion animal patients (dogs and cats). Skills such as intravenous catheter placement, endotracheal intubation, patient preparation and monitoring, and dental prophylaxis under general anesthesia will be stressed. The use and side effects of commonly used sedatives, analgesics and anesthetics will be covered. Postoperative procedures include patient monitoring and charting as well as client education for postoperative care. (6 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Admission in the Veterinary Technology program.

Co-requisite(s): Co-registration in ANSC 261.

DY

ANSC 263  Laboratory Animal Procedures

Introduction to the care and use of laboratory animals. Includes training in restraint, nursing, and husbandry of common laboratory animal species (rats, mice and rabbits). This course is intended for students entering lab animal medicine, veterinary technology, veterinary assisting or other animal-related fields. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ANSC 151 and ANSC 151L.

ANSC 266  Veterinary Clinical Practices & Internship II

A continuation of ANSC 190, this course provides veterinary technology students with additional practical experience in a clinical setting. Topics covered include: advanced sample collection & handling techniques, dentistry, administration of medications, anesthesiology & surgical assisting, and advanced nursing techniques. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with practical work experience. (9 hours internship).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in ANSC 190.

ANSC 271  Anesthesiology and Surgical Nursing for Veterinary Technicians

This course will focus on the clinical skills necessary for safe and effective anesthesia and surgery of companion animal patients (dogs and cats). Skills such as intravenous catheter placement, proper endotracheal intubation, patient and surgical site preparation, and patient monitoring under general anesthesia will be stressed. The use and side effects of commonly used sedatives, analgesics and anesthetics will be covered. Postoperative procedures include patient monitoring and charting as well as client education for postoperative care. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Admission into the Veterinary Technology program.

Co-requisite(s): Co-registration in ANSC 271L

DB

ANSC 290  Veterinary Technician Exam Review

This course prepares students for the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE). Topics include test-taking strategies, formation of a study plan, and a review of topics from previous veterinary technology courses. Students enrolled in this course will develop essential test-taking skills by completing practice exams covering all major topics of the WCC veterinary technology curriculum. (1 hour lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Permission of instructor.

Elect

 

Anthropology

ANTH 150  Human Adaptation

Human variation, physical and cultural, examined for its adaptiveness. Alternative explanations of human behavior, with implications for the future. (3 hours lecture).

DS

ANTH 151  Emerging Humanity

This course is an introduction to human biological evolution and the archaeology of culture in the world prior to AD 1500. (3 hours lecture).

ANTH 200  Cultural Anthropology

Nature of culture, introduction to basic concepts for analyzing cultural behavior; patterning, integration, and dynamics of culture; culture and the individual. (3 hours lecture).

DS

 

Aquaculture

AQUA 106  Small Scale Aquaculture

Survey of possibilities of small scale aquaculture. Application of basic biological and ecological concepts and theories to the selection, planning and design of small scale aquaculture systems. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: Registration in AQUA 106L.

DB

AQUA 106L  Small Scale Aquaculture Laboratory

Companion laboratory to AQUA 106, Small Scale Aquaculture. Practical, hands-on experiences in small scale aquaculture. Laboratory/field trip class. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in AQUA 106.

DY

 

Art

ART 101  Introduction to the Visual Arts

Art 101 is an introductory course that focuses on the question “What is the nature of visual art?” and the forms and conditions under which art is expressed. Projects will be required. Independent field trips to art galleries may be required. (3 hours lecture).

DA

ART 104D  Introduction to Printmaking/Screen Printing

Studio experience mainly for non-majors. An introduction to printmaking providing experience in the development of skills used in designing for screen printing on paper. Includes skill in photo screening. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree. (6 hours studio).

DA

ART 105B  Ceramics Studio Handbuilding I

Studio experience mainly for nonmajors. An introduction to clay as an art medium. Emphasis on basic handbuilding techniques, three-dimensional concepts in clay, glazing, decorating and firing kilns.
NOTE: Art Majors: ART 105B and ART 105C must both be taken to receive equivalency at UH Mānoa as an art elective. Liberal Arts Students: ART 105B or ART 105C will transfer to fulfill the Humanities DA core requirements. (6 hours studio).

DA

ART 105C  Ceramics Studio Wheelthrowing I

Studio experience mainly for non-majors. Introduction to the potter’s wheel. Emphasis on techniques of forming basic wheelthrown shapes on the electric or kick wheel. Emphasis also on decorating, glazing, and firing of ceramic pieces.
NOTE: Art Majors: ART 105B and ART 105C must both be taken to receive equivalency at UH Mānoa as an art elective. Liberal Arts Students: ART 105B or ART 105C will transfer to fulfill the Humanities DA core requirements. (6 hours studio).

DA

ART 107  Introduction to Photography

Studio experience mainly for non-majors. An introduction to black and white photography emphasizing a variety of picturemaking techniques. Assignments and field trips. Student must have film camera with adjustable shutter speeds and aperture settings. (6 hours studio).

DA

ART 111  Introduction to Watercolor Painting

Art 111 is an introduction to watercolor painting materials and techniques. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree. (6 hours studio).

Recommended Preparation: ART 101 and ART 113.

DA

ART 113  Introduction to Drawing

Art 113 is an introduction to the materials and techniques of drawing, focusing on line drawing, rendering, and the use of perspective. This course will include the study of the drawings of old and modern masters. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree. (6 hours studio).

Recommended Preparation: ART 101.

DA

ART 114  Introduction to Color

Art 114 is an introductory course focusing on color theory and the application of color as related to studio art practice. (6 hours studio).

Recommended Preparation: ART 101.

DA

ART 123  Introduction to Oil Painting

Art 123 is an introduction to the materials and techniques of oil painting. Classical painting techniques will be emphasized. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree. (6 hours studio).

Recommended Preparation: ART 101, 113 and 114.

DA

ART 207  Intermediate Photography: Techniques and Aesthetics of Photography

Basic techniques and esthetics of black and white photography; the camera as a tool for communication and self expression. Student must have a film camera with adjustable shutter speeds and aperture settings. Up to 6 credits applicable toward AA degree. (6 hours studio).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ART 107 or consent of instructor.

DA

ART 214  Introduction to Life Drawing

Art 214 is an introductory figure drawing course. Anatomical construction, light, space, diagrammatic analysis, and thematic content will be studied through the drawing process. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree. (6 hours studio).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ART 113 or consent of instructor.

Recommended Preparation: ART 101 and 213.

DA

ART 223  Intermediate Painting

Survey of late 19th and early 20th century studio practice. Completion of paintings which concentrate on historical styles as well as on a more personal direction. (6 hours studio).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ART 123.

DA

ART 243  Ceramics Studio Handbuilding II

Development of handbuilding techniques, sculptural and vessel concepts, and surface treatment and glazing. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree.
NOTE: Art Majors: ART 243 and 244 must both be taken to receive equivalency at UH Mānoa as ART 242, Introduction to Ceramics. (6 hours studio).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ART 105B or consent of instructor.

Recommended Preparation: ART 101, 116.

DA

ART 244  Ceramics Studio Wheelthrowing II

Development of wheelthrowing techniques, vessel and structural concepts, and surface treatment and glazing. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree.
NOTE: Art Majors: ART 243 and 244 must both be taken to receive equivalency at UH Mānoa as ART 242, Introduction to Ceramics. (6 hours studio).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ART 105C, or consent of instructor.

Recommended Preparation: ART 101, 105B, 116.

DA

ART 253  Figure Modeling

Modeling the human figure in clay, with emphasis on the basic skeletal structure and muscles in relation to surface modulation, proportion, volume and gesture. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree. (6 hours studio).

DA

ART 260  Gallery Design and Management

Design theory and techniques for presentation of art work and mounting an exhibition. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree. (6 hours studio).

DA

 

Astronomy

ASTR 110  Introduction to Astronomy

Introduction to the astronomical universe for non-science students. (3 hours lecture).

DP

ASTR 110L  Introduction to Astronomy Laboratory

Demonstration of astronomical principles through laboratory observations and analysis of astronomical data. Not required for ASTR 110. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in ASTR 110 or consent of instructor.

DY

ASTR 130  Introduction to Archaeoastronomy

Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of cultures and astronomy for non-science majors. Topics include naked-eye astronomy, myths and rituals, calendar systems, architectural alignments and navigation. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: ASTR 110.

DP

 

Biochemistry

BIOC 141  Fundamentals of Biochemistry

Biological chemistry focusing on the integration of concepts from general, inorganic, and biochemistry and their application to living systems. Satisfies the one-semester chemistry requirement for pre-nursing and pre-dental hygiene majors. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): A grade of 'C' or better in MATH 25 or higher or instructor's consent.

DP

 

Biology

BIOL 100  Human Biology

Introduction to structure and functions of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Topics related to physical fitness, nutrition, health, and disease. Not intended for science majors. Students who have received credit for or are currently enrolled in ZOOL 101 may not receive credit for BIOL 100. (3 hours lecture).

DB

BIOL 100L  Human Biology Laboratory

Laboratory to accompany BIOL 100 (Human Biology). Emphasizes the application of the scientific method, basic laboratory methods and procedures in biology, and facts and principles of human anatomy and physiology. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in BIOL 100 or equivalent preparation or consent of instructor.

DY

BIOL 101  Biology and Society

Historical development of scientific concepts, characteristics, and interaction of science and society from the perspective of biological sciences. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for MATH 25 or higher or equivalent preparation. Eligibility for placement in ENG 100, or consent of instructor.

DB DY

BIOL 171  General Biology I

First semester of introductory biology for all life science majors. Topics include: Overview of the science of biology; Cell structure, chemistry, growth, and reproduction; Classical, chromosomal and molecular genetics; Evolution, phylogeny and systematics; and Biology and diversity of viruses and bacteria. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: High school chemistry or college chemistry and registration in BIOL 171L.

DB

BIOL 171L  General Biology Lab I

Laboratory to accompany BIOL 171. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in BIOL 171.

Recommended Preparation: High school chemistry or college chemistry.

DY

BIOL 172  General Biology II

Continuation of BIOL 171. Topics include: Origin of eukaryotic organisms, their general characteristics, life cycles, systematics and evolution; Anatomy, physiology and classification of higher plants; Anatomy, physiology, behavior and classification of animals; and Basic ecological principles. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for BIOL 171

Recommended Preparation: Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 172L

DB

BIOL 172L  General Biology Lab II

Laboratory to accompany BIOL 172. (3 hours laboratory).

Co-requisite(s): BIOL 172.

Recommended Preparation: High school biology and college level reading and writing skills.

DY

BIOL 200  Coral Reefs

Introduction to the biology, ecology and geology of stony corals and the reef structures they build. Topics include, but not limited to, the following: photobiology, biochemistry, physiology, reproduction, ecology, biogeography and evolution of stony corals; contributions made by other members of the coral reef community, such as algae, invertebrates, fish, sea turtles, sea birds, and marine mammals; reef formation and geomorphology; corals as resources for human utilization and the impacts of human activities upon reefs throughout the world. Emphasis will be on Hawai‘i's coral reefs, but comparisons will be made among reefs from other areas. (3 hours lecture).

DB

BIOL 200L  Coral Reef Laboratory and Field Studies

Laboratory and field studies of the biology, ecology, and geology of stony corals and the reef structures they build; companion course to BIOL 200. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in BIOL 200 or consent of instructor.

Recommended Preparation: High school biology and algebra.

DY

BIOL 265  Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Principles of ecology and evolution for life science majors stressing integrated approach and recent advance. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for BIOL 171/171L and 172/172L; or one year of introductory college biology plus labs; or equivalent preparation; or consent of the instructor.

Co-requisite(s): BIOL 265L; or consent of instructor

DB

BIOL 265L  Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Lab

Laboratory to accompany BIOL 265. (3 hours laboratory).

Co-requisite(s): BIOL 265; or consent of the instructor.

Recommended Preparation: ICS 101 or ICS 105B-E; or familiarity with spreadsheets, word processing, and Internet browsers.

DY

 

Botany

BOT 101  General Botany

Introduction to plant structure, function, reproduction, and evolution; plants in relation to the environment and human activities. Lecture/laboratory/field trip course. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).

Recommended Preparation: High school biology.

DB DY

BOT 105  Ethnobotany

The scientific study of the interaction between human culture and plants, including the interrelationship of botany, socio-economics, belief systems and history that have shaped the cultural uses of plants in Hawaii, as well as Asia or the Pacific. Lecture/field trip course with service-learning option. (3 hours lecture).

DS

BOT 130  Plants in the Hawaiian Environment

Introduction to the evolution of plant communities and species of Hawaiian ecosystems; ecological interactions; observations, identification and systematics of native and introduced flora. Lecture/laboratory/field trip course. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).

DB DY

BOT 160  Identification of Tropical Plants

Nontechnical course in identification of common plants of tropics, including native and introduced flora. (3 hours lecture).

DB

BOT 205  Ethnobotanical Pharmacognosy

A study of medicinal plants of Hawai‘i, their characteristics, plant extraction, isolation and identification of their chemical constituents for possible uses in pharmaceuticals or in their natural state, and bioproduct manufacturing. This course is designed to train students for careers in plant and medical biotechnology. Lecture and laboratory/field trip course. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in any of these courses: BOT 101, BOT 105, BOT 130, MICR 130, MICR 140, BIOL 172/172L, CHEM 152/152L or consent of instructor.

Recommended Preparation: High school biology, chemistry and math.

DB DY

BOT 210  Phytobiotechnology

Introduction to practical aspects of Plant Biotechnology. Topics include micropropagation techniques, such as plant tissue, cell and protoplast cultures: DNA-based technologies, such as DNA extraction, DNA sequencing, PCR; and methods of plant genetic engineering. This course is designed to train students for careers in advanced agriculture technology and industry. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in BOT 101, or AG 152, or MICR 130 and MICR 140, or BIOL 171 and 171L, placement into MATH 25 or higher.

Recommended Preparation: High school biology or chemistry, MATH 24.

DB DY DY

 

Business

BUS 122  Introduction to Entrepreneurship

This course covers the basic economic and business principles regarding small-scale business enterprises. Focusing on the creation of a business plan, topics include researching and evaluating resources, planning, marketing, cultivating money resources, and understanding key concepts in law, budgeting, financial statements, and business documentation. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: BUS 120 and placement into ENG 100.

Elect

 

Chemistry

CHEM 100  Chemistry in Society

Introduction to chemistry for non-science majors. Discussion of basic chemistry concepts and their application to everyday life. Provides a survey of basic concepts and applications of chemistry with emphasis on the role of chemistry in the real world. This is suitable for students who have little or no background in chemistry and serves to fulfill a general education physical science core course for the nonscience major or as a preparatory course for CHEM 151 or BIOC 141. (3 hours lecture).

DP

CHEM 100L  Chemistry in Society Laboratory

Experiments in everyday chemistry. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in CHEM 100.

DY

CHEM 151  Elementary Survey of Chemistry

Provides the student with an adequate background in the fundamentals of chemistry. Covers the basic language and quantitative relationships of chemistry, including atomic structure, chemical bonding, structure-property relationships, chemical reactions. Prerequisite to CHEM 152 for majors in medical technology and nursing and other allied health and science-related fields, or can be taken as a preparatory course for CHEM 161. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for MATH 24 or higher and grade of “C” or better in ENG 21 or placement in ENG 22 or higher.

DP

CHEM 151L  Elementary Survey of Chemistry Laboratory

Experiments introducing laboratory techniques and illustrating chemical principles; supplemented by films, demonstrations, and problem sessions. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in CHEM 151.

DY

CHEM 161  General Chemistry I

Basic principles of inorganic chemistry with an emphasis on problem solving. First course of a two-course sequence designed to meet the one-year General Chemistry requirement for pre-med, science and engineering majors. Topics include chemical calculations, electronic structure, chemical bonding, states of matter and solutions. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in Math 103 or higher, or placement into Math 135 or consent of instructor.

Co-requisite(s): Registration in CHEM 161L.

Recommended Preparation: Student should have taken high school chemistry, CHEM 100, or CHEM 151.

DP

CHEM 161L  General Chemistry Laboratory I

Laboratory experiments illustrating fundamental principles of chemistry. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in CHEM 161.

DY

CHEM 162  General Chemistry II

Second course of a two-course sequence designed to meet the one-year General Chemistry requirement for pre-med, science and engineering majors. Topics include thermochemistry, kinetics, acid-base equilibrium, solubility equilibrium and electrochemistry. Emphasis on problem solving. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in CHEM 161, credit for or registration in MATH 135, or consent of instructor.

Co-requisite(s): CHEM 162L.

DP

CHEM 162L  General Chemistry Laboratory II

Laboratory experiments illustrating fundamental principles of chemistry. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in CHEM 162.

DY

 

Economics

ECON 130  Principles of Economics (Microeconomics)

Study of how individuals make decisions which affect their income and wealth; how firms make decisions which affect profits and production. Relationship to demand, supply and prices of goods, and natural resources. (3 hours lecture).

DS

ECON 131  Principles of Economics (Macroeconomics)

Study of the economic forces which determine a country’s income, employment, and prices. Roles of consumers, businesses, banks, and governments are explored. (3 hours lecture).

DS

 

English

ENG 20  Reading and Writing Essentials

This course provides practice in developing basic reading and writing skills and learning strategies to help students succeed in college or the work force--with a focus on vocabulary development, comprehension skills, study skills, paragraph development, grammar, mechanics, and punctuation. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Placement in ENG 20 or grade of C or better in ENG 8.

ENG 22  Introduction to Expository Writing

This course prepares students for college-level writing with practice in the writing process, instruction in grammar and mechanics, emphasis on effective paragraphs and essays, and introduction to research techniques. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Placement into ENG 22 or higher, or grade of “C” or better in ENG 21 and a grade of “C” or better in ENG 97B or ENG 19, or consent of instructor.

ENG 23  Introduction to College Reading and Writing

This course prepares students for college-level reading and writing with practice in the writing process, instruction in grammar and mechanics, emphasis on effective paragraphs and essays, introduction to research techniques, and practice in vocabulary development and reading comprehension. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Compass placement in ENG 23, grade of C or better in ENG 18 or ENG 20, or grade of C or better in ENG 19 and reading score of 56-78.

ENG 100  Expository Writing

This college-level composition course promotes critical reading, the writing process, rhetorical principles, research strategies, and the documentation of sources. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in ENG 22 or placement into ENG 100 or approval of designated Language Arts representative.

FW

ENG 204A  Introduction to Creative Writing (Fiction)

English 204A Introduction to Creative Writing (fiction) introduces students to the basic practices and principles involved in the writing and publication of short stories and novels. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in ENG 100, or consent of instructor.

DA

ENG 204B  Introduction to Creative Writing (Poetry)

English 204B Introduction to Creative Writing (Poetry) introduces students to the basic practices and principles involved in the writing and publication of poems. (3 hours lecture ).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in ENG 100, or consent of instructor.

Recommended Preparation: Students should possess a strong foundational knowledge of grammar, word usage, and punctuation. Additionally, students must be able to accept constructive criticism from peers and the instructor.

DA

ENG 209  Business Writing

A study of business and managerial writing; practice in writing letters, memos, and reports, including a report requiring research and documentation. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in ENG 100.

DL

ENG 271  Introduction to Literature: Genre

This course introduces students to the study of significant works of literature in selected genres. Emphasis is on discussion of and writing about characteristics and themes of the works. A student may enroll in this course more than one time (for different genres); however, only three credits will be applied toward degree. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): A grade of "C" or better in ENG 100.

DL

ENG 272  Introduction to Literature: Culture and Literature

This course introduces students to the study of significant works of literature in selected cultures and cultural formations. Emphasis is on discussion of and writing about characteristics and themes of the works. A student may enroll in this course more than one time (for different cultures); however, only three credits will be applied toward degree. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in ENG 100.

DL

ENG 280  Book Production: Rain Bird Literary and Art Journal

This course is intended to acquaint students with the theory, practice, and skills required to publish a book (the Rain Bird Literary and Art Journal), and, by extension, enable students to participate in the production of any small publication such as magazines, handbooks, manuals, brochures, flyers, newsletters, etc. To varying degrees over two semesters, the course covers planning, publicity, selection, editing, proofreading, layout, production, distribution, and celebration. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in Eng 100 or consent of instructor.

Recommended Preparation: Willingness to carry out collaborative responsibilities on time and to work cooperatively with others. Strong knowledge of grammar, word usage, and punctuation. Awareness of literary forms and styles. Basic computer skills. An eye for visual detail.

Elect

 

Family Resources

FAMR 230  Human Development

This course provides students with theories of biological, cognitive, and psycho-social development from infancy to adulthood and with similarities and differences among individuals and their cultures. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: PSY 100.

DS

 

Food Science and Human Nutrition

FSHN 185  Human Nutrition

An introductory level biological science course which integrates basic concepts of science with the study of human nutrition. Designed for students who want an introduction to nutrition, as well as those who later choose to major in it. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Placement into ENG 100 and MATH 25 or higher, or consent of instructor.

DB

 

Geographic Information Systems

GIS 150  Introduction to GIS/GPS

An introductory course in the applications of geographic information systems (GIS) with a special emphasis on using ArcView GIS. Includes database construction and techniques for spatial data manipulation, analysis and display. Students will also gain basic experience with the use of Global Positioning System (GPS). Applications will be cross-disciplinary in nature, including such fields as the environmental sciences, business marketing, geopolitical demography, health/epidemic monitoring and real estate management. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: Familiarity with basic computer operations and databases.

DS

 

Geography

GEOG 101  The Natural Environment

Survey of the natural environment; distribution and interrelationships of climates, vegetation, soil, and land forms. (3 hours lecture).

DP

GEOG 101L  The Natural Environment Laboratory

Analysis by use of maps, air photos, field and laboratory observation, and experimentation. Emphasis on Hawai‘i and on human modification of environment. Required field trips during regular class hours. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in GEOG 101.

DY

GEOG 102  World Regional Geography

Geography 102 is a survey of the world's major cultural regions. Environmental, cultural, political, and economic characteristics of each region and regional interactions are explored from a geographic perspective. (3 hours lecture).

DS

GEOG 151  Geography and Contemporary Society

Elements of population geography and urban studies, economic geography and resource management; application to current problems of developed and underdeveloped countries. (3 hours lecture).

DS

 

Geology and Geophysics

GG 101  Introduction to Geology

The natural physical environment; the landscape; rocks and minerals, rivers and oceans; volcanism, earthquakes and other processes inside the Earth; effects of human use on the Earth and its resources. Field trip. (3 hours lecture).

DP

GG 103  Geology of the Hawaiian Islands

Hawaiian geology and geologic processes: origin of Hawaiian Islands, volcanism, rocks and minerals, land forms, stream and coastal processes, landslides, earthquakes and tsunamis, ground water, geologic and environmental hazards. Field trips arranged. (3 hours lecture).

DP

GG 210  O‘ahu Field Geology

Field trip and laboratory sessions relating to the Geology of O‘ahu. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in GG 101, GG 103, or consent of instructor.

DY

GG 211  Big Island Field Geology

A four-day field trip on the island of Hawai‘i. A survey of Hawaiian volcanic processes is illustrated by studying Kilauea, Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, and Kohala volcanoes. Students are responsible for air and ground transportation, meals, and lodging. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in GG 101, GG 103, or consent of instructor. Must have medical clearance.

DY

 

Hawaiian Language

HAW 101  Elementary Hawaiian I

An elementary course in the Hawaiian language which focuses on rules of grammar, pattern drills, the building of an adequate vocabulary to facilitate conversation, and reading of selected materials at an elementary level. (4 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory).

HAW 201  Intermediate Hawaiian I

Continuation of HAW 102 with emphasis on increasing proficiency in use of major sentence patterns in reading, writing, conversation, and translation. (4 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for HAW 102 or consent of instructor.

 

Hawaiian Studies

HWST 107  Hawai‘i: Center of the Pacific

An introduction to Hawai‘i and Hawaiian culture in the context of the larger Pacific, including Hawaiian origins, settlement, language, land, history, society, religion and the arts. (3 hours lecture).

DH

HWST 130  Hula ‘Ōlapa: Traditional Hawaiian Dance

In this class students will learn various beginning traditional hula interpretations. Students will be taught the basic footwork and hand gestures of traditional hula accompanied by chanting, Ipu Heke (double gourd) or Pahu (drum). Students may also be required to make accompanying instruments like Ipu (smaller single gourd), Kala‘au (sticks), ‘Ili‘ili (stones), and Pū‘ili (split bamboo), and learn accompanying oli (chants) under the direction of the class Instructor. Students will be taught different historical aspects of specific hula, associated hula mythology, ali‘i (chiefly) genealogies, plants and place names. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory).

DA

HWST 135  Kālai Lā‘au: Hawaiian Woodwork and Wood Carving

This is a Hawaiian cultural woodwork and wood carving project class. This class will involve the development of two to three introductory woodworking projects of Hawaiian cultural significance or ceremonial use. Through this class the students will develop both the skills needed to work effectively and safely with wood, and the cultural knowledge important to the pieces developed. As a project class, there will be specific projects and themes set by the instructor of general Hawaiian cultural interest. Students will learn different aspects and solutions in carving and creating Hawaiian cultural projects. (6 hours studio).

DA

HWST 136  Kālai Lā‘au II: Advanced Techniques in Hawaiian Carving

This is a Hawaiian cultural carving class that is a continuation of the themes and techniques learned in HWST 135 Kāai La'au. Students will be required to complete at least one large piece and two highly finished smaller pieces. Students will be expected to have a basic understanding of carving upon entering the class and will spend their time rme tuning and working on a larger scale. Through this class students will develop skills and techniques with more advanced tools needed to work effectively and safely with wood, bone, and/or stone, and students will acquire the cultural knowledge important to the pieces developed. Students wnt also learn how to make some of the tools required for use in the class. (6 hours studio).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for HWST 135 with a grade of "B" or better, or consent of the instructor.

DA

HWST 222  Ma‘awe No‘eau: Hawaiian Fiber Work

This is a Hawaiian cultural fiber arts project class. This class will involve the development of three to four introductory fiber arts projects of Hawaiian cultural significance or ceremonial use. Through this class students wilileam how to procure the materials needed to complete various fiber arts projects, including learning related protocol and methods for gathering, understanding of Native Hawaiian gathering rights, and the type of environments in which specific materials grow and can be gathered, Students will develop the skills needed to work effectively and safely with various fiber arts materials on introductory projects, and students will learn the cultural knowledge important to the pieces created. As a project class, there will be specific projects and themes set by the instructor of general Hawaiian cultural interest. (6 hours studio).

DA

HWST 255  Introduction to the Hawaiian Kingdom

This course covers the origins and features of the Hawaiian state. Starting with Hawai`i's roots as a navigator society, this course explores the island kingdoms of Kaua`i, O`ahu, Maui and Hawai`i island. Detailed interaction between Hawaiians and navigators from other countries around the world such as Cook and Vancouver open up an investigation through the reign of Kamehameha I and his powerful wife Ka`ahumanu. The decision to construct a constitutional monarchy, achieve state recognition and develop a modern nation-state are examined further through the eighty-eight year period of Kingdom of Hawai`i statecraft. Using tools from history, linguistics, political science and law, students will engage the transition of Hawaiian political systems as they emerged across specific periods with an eye towards developing theoretical frameworks for understanding why Hawaiian political systems progressed as they did. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in HWST 107, HIST 284 or HIST 224.

DH

HWST 270  Hawaiian Mythology

A survey of gods, ‘aumakua, kupua, mythical heroes, heroines and their kinolau as the basis of traditional Hawaiian metaphor. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for HWST 107 or HAW 102.

DH

HWST 275  Wahi Pana: Mythology of the Hawaiian Landscape

Wahi Pana: Mythology of the Landscape, is designed to illuminate Hawaiian intelligence regarding the geographic features of these islands. Students will undertake a basic study of the natural sciences from a Western/modern perspective. They will then look at various Hawaiian chants and epic tales to explore the connections with indigenous knowledge forms found in a Hawaiian worldview. Cross-cultural comparisons are made with the goal of bringing forth specific, physical information about important Hawaiian places. Students will gain cultural awareness of their surroundings through the bridging of geography and the mythology studied, thus creating a more Hawaiian sense-of-place in our community. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in HWST 107, or HWST 270.

Recommended Preparation: REL 205.

HWST 275L  Wahi Pana: Mythology of the Hawaiian Landscape Field Lab

This field lab supports HWST 275. Together, they illuminate Hawaiian intelligence regarding the geographic features of these islands. The course highlights the Ko‘olau districts (Waimānalo to Waimea) or O‘ahu as a living classroom resource where the Wahi Pana (sacred places) and mythology of the landscape can be seen and appreciated. Students will explore connections between Ihe social and natural sciences, and indigenous knowledge forms found in a Hawaiian worldview from observing their physical surroundings. Cross-cultural comparisons are made with the goal of bringing forth specific, physical information about important Hawaiian places. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Enrollment or credit in HWST 275 lecture component

DH

HWST 285  Lā‘au Lapa‘au I: Hawaiian Medicinal Herbs

In this class students will learn the basic philosophy and traditions surrounding Hawaiian healing herbs. Students will also learn how to identify, grow, harvest, prepare, store and use these herbs for various human ailments. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for HWST 107 or BOT 105.

DH

HWST 296  Special Topics in Hawaiian Studies

Students will investigate important topics in Hawaiian Studies such as specific people, events, or periods. Nine credits may be applied to the AA degrees (with different topics). (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): "C" or better in HWST 107

HSE Elect

 

Health

HLTH 125  Survey of Medical Terminology

HLTH 125 familiarizes the student with medical terminology used in both human and animal medicine through analysis of prefixes, suffixes, and word roots. This course covers the pronunciation, spelling, and definitions of selected medical words dealing with mammalian body systems. Commonly used medical abbreviations and pharmacological terms are also discussed. (1 hour lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in ENG 21 or ENG 23 or placement into ENG 22 or higher.

 

History

HIST 151  World Civilization I

A global and historical survey focusing on human societies and cross-cultural interactions to 1500 C.E. (3 hours lecture).

FGA

HIST 152  World Civilization II

A global and historical survey focusing on human societies and cross-cultural interactions since 1500 C.E. (3 hours lecture).

FGB

HIST 230  Pre-Modern European Civilization

A survey of Pre-Modern Europe to 1500 CE. Focus is given to the political evolution and the major economic, social, and cultural development of European states. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: HIST 151

DH

HIST 241  Civilizations of Asia I

A survey course covering the development of the major civilizations of East Asia, South and Southeast Asia, and historical personages and events from the earliest periods to the 1500’s. (3 hours lecture).

DH

HIST 242  Civilizations of Asia II

A survey course focusing on the changes/development of the major civilizations of East Asia, South and Southeast Asia from the Sixteenth Century to the present. Particular emphasis placed on an analysis of representative Asian societies, the Asian response to the West, and Asian nationalism. (3 hours lecture).

DH

HIST 284  History of Hawai‘i

A general study of the social, political and economic development of Hawai‘i from the ancient Hawaiians to the present. (3 hours lecture).

DH

 

Information and Computer Sciences

ICS 50  Basic Computer Skills

In this introductory computer course, students will learn basic file management, e-mail, word processing, and presentation software. Students will learn to find and evaluate information found on the Web. This course is recommended for students with few or no computer skills. (3 hours lecture).

ICS 100  Computing Literacy and Applications

An introductory survey of computers and their role in the information world emphasizing computer terminology, hardware and software. Opportunities for "hands-on" experience using applications software may include spreadsheets, word processing, presentations, communications and databases. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: Credit in both ENG 22 or ENG 23 and MATH 22 or higher.

ICS 101  Digital Tools for the Information World

Hands-on computer class with emphasis on producing professional-level documents, spreadsheets, presentations, database, and web pages for problem solving. Includes concepts, terminology, and a contemporary operating system. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: High School algebra.

ICS 107  Web Site Development

An introduction to the concepts and skills for developing websites from planning through publishing. Design, usability, accessibility, markup and styling language, and integrating media will be emphasized. Web development software utilized. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: Intermediate computing skills including file management and common computing skills: cut, copy, paste, open/save files, web search.

ICS 111  Introduction to Computer Science

Intended for computer science majors and all others interested in a first course in programming. An overview of the fundamentals of computer science emphasizing problem solving, algorithm development, implementation, and debugging/testing using an object-oriented programming language. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for MATH 103 or higher; or consent of instructor.

ICS 119  Introduction to Social Media

This computing course explores the foundations of building a presence on the Web, developing an entity's brand and creating a social channel to share ideas, expertise and business philosophies. Topics covered: choosing a domain name, securing a content hosting service, initiating content creation, and constructing a social web channel. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: Write well-formed sentences and organized paragraphs using proper grammar and correct spelling. Have computing skills including file management, uploading/downloading files and Internet search skills.

Elect

ICS 123  Introduction to Audio and Video Editing

This is an introductory computer course covering digital audio and video editing. This introduction to digital software includes principles of recording and editing, and preparing products for publishing to the Web. Subjects include basic editing techniques, customizing settings, capturing video and audio, and final output. The course also covers basic shooting techniques for video. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: Intermediate computing skills including file management and common computing skill including cut,copy, paste,open/save files and web search.

ICS 141  Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science I

This course covers logic, sets, functions, matrices, algorithmic concepts, mathematical reasoning, recursion, counting techniques, and probability theory. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 103 or placement into MATH 135 or higher, or consent of instructor.

FS

ICS 203  Digital Image Editing

Introduces the terminology, tools, features and techniques of industry-standard digital image editing, photo retouching, and color correction of images. Topics include navigating user interfaces, compositing multiple images into a layered digital file, precision masking and edge control of selections, digital painting and image repair, professional color manipulation techniques, high-volume automation uses and procedures, visual filters and special effects, perspective and 2-dimensional representations of 3-dimensional space and lighting, optimizing and slicing images for websites, preparing images for video broadcast and print reproduction, animation fundamentals and output. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: Intermediate Computing Skills which include the following: File management File compression Upload/download files Internet search skills Troubleshooting skills

Elect

ICS 208  Website Design

Introduces basic principles related to website design including terminology, tools, media, layout principles, and concepts. Topics and tasks include the creation of digital images and media for Web use, the integration of design elements into websites, and the development of skills in industry-standard computer programs. (3 hours lecture ).

Pre-requisite(s): ICS107 or consent of instructor

ICS 211  Introduction to Computer Science II

Reinforce and strengthen problem solving skills using more advanced features of programming languages and algorithms such as recursion, pointers, and memory management. Emphasize the use of data structures such as arrays, lists, stacks and queues. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in ICS 111 or consent of instructor.

 

Interdisciplinary Studies

IS 103  Introduction to College

This course is designed to orient first-time students to a college setting. Students will learn (1) the tools, techniques, methods, procedures, processes, skills, resources, and attitudes for success; (2) the programs and services of a postsecondary institution of higher education; and (3) to design a personal, comprehensive, postsecondary academic plan. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Placement in ENG 22 or higher or consent of instructor.

IS 160A  Polynesian Voyaging and Seamanship

This course focuses on the fundamentals of voyaging and seamanship by blending the traditions of Polynesian culture, history and skills with modern science and technology. An interdisciplinary approach is used in treating topics in Hawaiian studies, astronomy, geology, oceanography, meteorology, marine biology, ethnobotany and archaeology of Polynesia and Hawai‘i. (3 hours lecture).

DP

IS 160B  Polynesian Voyaging and Seamanship

This course focuses on the fundamentals of voyaging and sea-manship by blending the traditions of Polynesian culture, history and skills with modern science and technology. An interdisciplinary approach is used in treating topics in Hawaiian studies, astronomy, geology, oceanography, meteorology, marine biology, ethnobotany and archaeology of Polynesia and Hawai‘i. (3 hours lecture).

Co-requisite(s): IS 160L

DP

IS 160L  Polynesian Voyaging and Seamanship Lab

Laboratory/field trip course designed to acquire seamanship skills and apply knowledge of astronomy, geology, oceanography, meteorology, marine biology, ethnobotany and archaeology through sailing and environmental exploring activities. Optional coastal and/or inter-island voyaging field trips may be offered. (Students will be responsible for fees for each activity.) (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): 1. Minimum water skills and survival requirements: Pass the following water survival tests, which will be administered by the second lab: ability to swim a minimum of 500 yards in the open ocean using any strokes; ability to tread water for 30 minutes in the open ocean. 2. Health clearance: A written statement must be signed by a medical physician certifying that the student is physically capable of participating in the sailing activities scheduled for the lab. Health clearance must be submitted by the date of the first sailing lab.

Co-requisite(s): IS 160B

IS 201  The Ahupua‘a

Study of the traditional Hawaiian approaches to natural resource development, utilization, exploitation, and management. The ahupua’a, as the traditional Hawaiian unit of land and sea subdivision, beginning in the upland forests, stretching across lower elevations, past the shoreline to the edge of the reef, will be evaluated as a microcosm of an integrated ecosystem and as a model for natural resource management and sustainability. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, fieldwork).

Recommended Preparation: BIOL 101 or BIOL 124 or similar preparation.

DB DY

IS 204  Themes in Popular Culture

An interdisciplinary study of a specific event, person, idea, or process in popular culture which will bring together various methodologies and conceptual tools to create a complex analysis. Topics covered will include: the concept of popular culture, how elements of popular culture are created and circulated, how elements of popular culture connect to historical, political, social, symbolic and intellectual history, how different groups in society are related to the elements of popular culture, and how popular culture plays a role in the lives of individuals. (3 hours lecture).

 

Japanese Language

JPNS 101  Elementary Japanese I

An introductory course focusing on grammar and vocabulary sufficient to maintain conversation at the elementary level and on the three writing systems: hiragana, katakana, and kanji. (4 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory).

JPNS 102  Elementary Japanese II

A continuation of JPNS 101 focusing on additional grammar topics and increased vocabulary to maintain conversation at the elementary level and on the three writing systems: hiragana, katakana, and kanji. (4 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for JPNS 101 or consent of instructor.

JPNS 201  Intermediate Japanese I

A continuation of JPNS 102 focusing on additional grammar topics and increased vocabulary to maintain conversation at the intermediate level and on the three writing systems: hiragana, katakana, and kanji. (4 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for JPNS 102 or consent of instructor.

JPNS 202  Intermediate Japanese II

A continuation of JPNS 201 focusing on additional grammar topics and increased vocabulary to maintain conversation with greater proficiency at the intermediate level and on the three writing systems: hiragana, katakana, and kanji. (4 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit JPNS 201 or consent of instructor.

 

Journalism

JOUR 205  News Writing

An introductory course in news writing, news gathering and journalistic ethics. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ENG 100.

JOUR 285V  Newspaper Laboratory

Complete production of the student newspaper, including fact gathering, writing, layout, editing, and photography. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree.

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ENG 100. Credit for or registration in JOUR 205 or consent of instructor.

 

Linguistics

LING 102  Introduction to Language

An investigation of the nature and function of language, its sounds, structures and semantics, oral and written expression, acquisition and change. General linguistic principles applicable to all languages will be covered. We will learn ways of talking about language that will enable us to discuss language and understand what linguists do and say. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ENG 22 or higher or consent of instructor.

DH

 

Math

MATH 21  Developmental Mathematics I

This course is designed to help student review and master the basics of mathematics. Topics include an introduction to expressions and equations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratios and proportions, percents, geometric formulas, and similar triangles. (4 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Satisfactory math placement test score or consent of instructor.

MATH 21A  Basic College Mathematics

This course is designed to help students review and master the basics of mathematics. Emphasis will be placed on numeration, whole numbers, fractions, mixed numbers, decimals, and ratios and proportions. (2 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Satisfactory math placement test score or consent of instructor.

MATH 21B  Basic College Mathematics II

This course prepares students who want to strengthen computation and problem-solving skills before proceeding to an elementary algebra course. Includes the concept of variables, using rational numbers, solving simple equations in one variables, percent, and word problems. (2 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in Math 21A, satisfactory math placement test score or consent of instructor.

MATH 24  Elementary Algebra I

MATH 24 represents the first course in a two course sequence covering elementary algebra topics. Topics include operations with real numbers; linear equations and inequalities; graphing; linear systems; and applications. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 22, MATH 21B, MATH 19 or equivalent; satisfactory placement test score, or consent of instructor.

MATH 25  Elementary Algebra II

MATH 25 represents the second course in a two course sequence covering elementary algebra topics. Topics include properties of exponents; operations on polynomials; factoring; rational expressions and equations; roots and radicals; quadratic equations; and applications. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 24 or MATH 28 or equivalent, satisfactory math placement test score, or consent of instructor.

MATH 28  Developmental Mathematics II

This course is a continuation of Developmental Mathematics I and a preparation for students to take Math 100, Math 101 or Philosophy 110 to fulfill the Symbolic Reasoning requirement. Topics include an introduction to Real numbers (including basic roots, signed numbers and properties) and algebraic expressions, linear equations and inequalities in one variable, linear equations and inequalities in two variables, and selected topics - Quadratic Formula, parabola, systems of equations and inequalities, scientific notation, and variation. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 19, MATH 21, MATH 21B, MATH 22, or MATH 24 or equivalent; satisfactory math placement test score or consent of instructor.

MATH 29  Developmental Mathematics III

This course is a continuation of Developmental Mathematics II. Topics include exponents and polynomials, factoring polynomials and applications, functions, rational expressions and equations, and roots and radicals (including the Square Root Property). (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 24 or MATH 28 or equivalent, satisfactory math placement test score, or consent of instructor.

MATH 100  Survey of Mathematics

An introduction to quantitative and logical reasoning for the nonscience/nonmathematics major. The question, “What is mathematics?” is explored, while focusing on mathematical systems or models, cultivating an appreciation for mathematics as an aesthetic art, and developing skills in problemsolving and analysis. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 25 or MATH 28 or equivalent, satisfactory math placement test score, or consent of instructor.

FS

MATH 101  Mathematics for Veterinary Assistants

An introduction to clinical calculations used in veterinary medicine. Topics include the application of mathematical skills to solve applied problems in veterinary nursing and pharmaceutical dispensing with emphasis on dosage, concentration, dilution and drip rates. Also included is mathematical and laboratory terminology. This course is intended for students entering veterinary technology, veterinary assisting or other animal-related fields. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 25 or MATH 28 or equivalent, satisfactory math placement test score, or consent of instructor.

MATH 103  College Algebra

Linear equations, inequalities, systems of equations, polynomials, functions, fractional expressions and equations, exponents, powers, roots, quadratic equations and functions; rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. (4 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 25 or MATH 29 or equivalent, satisfactory math placement test score, or consent of instructor.

FS

MATH 111  Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I

Math 111 is the first of a two-course sequence designed to give prospective elementary education majors the depth of understanding necessary to teach mathematics in the elementary classroom. Topics include number (natural numbers, integers, fractions, and real numbers) and operations, sets, patterns, functions and algebra. Emphasis will be on communication, connections and problem solving, representations, and reasoning and proof. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 25 or MATH 29 or equivalent, satisfactory placement test score, and grade of “C” or better in ENG 22 or placement in ENG 100.

MATH 112  Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II

Math 112 is the second of a two-course sequence designed to give prospective elementary education majors the depth of understanding necessary to teach mathematics in the elementary classroom. Topics include the representation of and operations on the natural numbers and properties of those operations. Emphasis will be on communication, connections and problem solving, representation and reasoning. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 111.

FS

MATH 115  Statistics

An introduction to topics in statistics, with a brief look at elementary probability. This is a valuable course for business, natural science, social science, health science and computer science majors. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 25 or MATH 29 or equivalent, satisfactory math placement test score, or consent of instructor.

MATH 135  Precalculus: Elementary Functions

An analysis of elementary functions. A study of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Topics also include graphing techniques, transformations, applications and related topics. Emphasis is placed on topics which will prove useful to students planning to take calculus and also to those who are interested in pursuing math-related careers. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 103 or equivalent, satisfactory math placement test score, or consent of instructor.

FS

MATH 140  Precalculus: Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry

Study of the elements of trigonometry and analytic geometry including trigonometric functions and their inverses, relations, graphs, and applications; conic sections; vector applications; cartesian and polar coordinate systems; parametric equations and applications; and related topics. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 135 or equivalent, satisfactory math placement test score, or consent of instructor.

FS

MATH 203  Calculus for Business and the Social Sciences

Basic mathematical concepts, topics in differentiation and introductory integration of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Related applications to management, finance, economics and social science will be considered. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 135 or equivalent, satisfactory math placement test score or consent of instructor.

FS

MATH 205  Calculus I

Basic mathematical concepts, topics in differentiation, and introductory integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Applications of differentiation and integration will be demonstrated. (4 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 140 or equivalent, satisfactory math placement test score, or consent of instructor.

FS

MATH 206  Calculus II

Differentiation and integration concepts of trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic and hyperbolic functions. Integration implements, infinite series, and applications of derivatives and integrals are also featured. (4 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 205 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

MATH 231  Calculus III

Vector-oriented study of functions of several variables; partial differentiation and line integrals; multiple integrals. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in MATH 206 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

MATH 232  Calculus IV

Math 232 is the fourth course in the calculus sequence. Topics include multiple integrals, line integrals, Green's Theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Gauss' Theorem and differential equations. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): "C" or better in Math 231 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Elect

 

Meteorology

MET 101  Introduction to Meteorology

Introduction to Meteorology (MET 101) studies basic atmospheric physics, Sun-Earth-atmosphere-ocean-human interrelationships, major weather systems and forecasting, with special emphasis on Hawai‘i. For both science and non-science majors and prospective science teachers. (3 hours lecture).

DP

 

Microbiology

MICR 130  General Microbiology

Fundamentals of microbiology, growth, development, and classification of bacteria, viruses, protozoa, fungi and algae; roles of microorganisms in the environment and human affairs: medical microbiology, immunology, and applied microbiology for food sanitation and public health. (3 hours lecture).

DB

MICR 140  General Microbiology Laboratory

Laboratory course illustrating fundamental techniques and concepts of microbiology, such as microscopic observations, aseptic transfer, microorganism classification and identification, environmental factors influencing microorganisms, biochemistry of microorganisms, ecological microbiology, and medical microbiology. This course is designed to complement MICR 130. Primarily for students in nursing, dental hygiene and nutrition. Science laboratory course. (4 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in MICR 130; placement into MATH 24 or higher.

DY

 

Music

MUS 108  Fundamentals of Western Music

A basic music theory course. Emphasis on learning basic concepts involved in reading and writing music. Notation and reading of simple and compound rhythm, pitch, intervals and triads. Application to performance. (3 hours lecture).

DA

MUS 114  College Chorus

Rehearsal and performance of classical, popular, and Polynesian/ethnic choral literature. Elementary Polynesian dance may be included as part of performance. Open to all students. No previous choral experience required. Extra curricular concert attendance required. Student will complete one level of MusicLab Melody (8 modules of 10 quizzes each). Up to 7 credits applicable toward AA degree. (3 hours rehearsal).

DA

MUS 121B  Voice 1

Performance class designed for students with little or no vocal experience. Deals with vocal production and literature for voice. Student will complete one level of MusicLab Melody (8 modules of 10 quizzes each). May be repeated up to 4 credits; only 2 credits applicable towards the AA degree. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours rehearsal).

DA

MUS 121C  Piano 1

Basic principles of performance. Relevant problems in piano literature at elementary level. MUS 121C, 122C must be taken in sequence. Student will complete one level of MusicLab Melody (8 modules of 10 quizzes each). May be repeated up to 6 credits; only 2 credits applicable towards the AA degree. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours rehearsal).

DA

MUS 121F  Beginning Slack Key Guitar

Basic principles of performance; relevant problems in literature. Student learns to play two G tunings. This course is intended for students with little or no background in this style of guitar playing. Ability to read music is not required. (3 hours lecture/studio).

DA

MUS 121Z  Beginning Ukulele

Basic principles of performance; relevant problems in literature. Introductory course in ukulele. Focus on principles of performance. Course is intended for students with little or no experience in playing the ukulele. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours rehearsal).

DA

MUS 122B  Voice 2

Performance class designed for students with previous vocal experience or training. Deals with vocal production and literature for voice. Student will complete one level of MusicLab Melody (8 modules of 10 quizzes each). May be repeated up to 4 credits; only 2 credits applicable towards the AA degree. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours rehearsal).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for MUS 121B or consent of instructor.

DA

MUS 122C  Piano 2

Designed for further study of principles and basic skills of piano performance established in first semester piano. Continues the group participation chord approach with greater emphasis on ensemble playing and improvisation. MUS 121C and 122C must be taken in sequence. Student will complete one level of MusicLab Melody (8 modules of 10 quizzes each). (1 hour lecture, 2 hours rehearsal).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for MUS 121C.

DA

MUS 122F  Intermediate Slack Key Guitar I

Intermediate slack key guitar: level I. Student learns to play solos in C tunings and intermediate solos at level I in tunings learned in the elementary class. (3 hours lecture/studio).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for MUS 121F or consent of instructor.

DA

MUS 122Z  Intermediate Ukulele

Continuation of MUS 121Z. Increased emphasis on ukulele literature. Focus on principles of performance. Emphasis on ensemble playing. (3 hours lecture/studio).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MUS 121Z or consent of instructor.

DA

MUS 177  Introduction to Hawaiian Music

A survey of Hawaiian music from Polynesian origins and pre-contact traditional forms to acculturated and contemporary forms and expressions including vocal, instrumental and dance music in their social, cultural and religious contexts. (3 hours lecture).

MUS 221C  Piano 3

Continuation of MUS 122C. Increased emphasis on piano literature up to the intermediate level. MUS 221 and MUS 222C must be taken in sequence. Student will complete one level of MusicLab Melody (8 modules of 10 quizzes each). May be repeated up to 6 credits; only 2 credits applicable towards the AA degree. (1 hour lecture, 2 hours rehearsal).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for MUS 122C or consent of instructor.

DA

MUS 222C  Piano 4

Continuation of MUS 221C. Increased emphasis on piano technique and literature up to the intermediate level. Introduction to accompanying. MUS 221C and MUS 222C must be taken in sequence. Student will complete one level of MusicLab Melody (8 modules of 10 quizzes each). (1 hour lecture, 2 hours rehearsal).

Pre-requisite(s): MUS 221C

DA

MUS 240  Introduction to Digital Music Production

Introduction to digital music and sound production on the Macintosh platform: MIDI sequencing, audio recording, music arranging, editing, mixing and mastering; preparing audio files for CD, video and web applications; sound synthesis and programming using virtual instruments. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): MUS 108, 121 (alpha) or 253; or consent of instructor.

Recommended Preparation: Basic Keyboard (piano) skills, computer (Mac) skills.

MUS 253  Elementary Music In Action

Deals with musical concepts, philosophy & pedagogy; the use of media, singing, movement, and instruments; and resources for an active elementary classroom. Presents correlation between music and brain development in early childhood. Intended for Education majors. Music is a vital stimulus to the developmental process and contributes to the emergence of positive self-esteem. Elementary education candidates learn to apply appropriate strategies in order to provide music making as part of everyday classroom activities. (3 hours lecture).

DA

 

Oceanography

OCN 101  Introduction to the Marine Option Program

This course provides an overview of statewide issues and organizations involved with ocean and freshwater activities, including management, education, research and business. It also provides an orientation to the Marine Option Program (MOP) and reviews the requirements of the MOP certificate. The course explores opportunities for internships, projects and careers related to water environments. The course will present guidelines on proposal writing, project implementation, data collection and interpretation, and final report preparation and presentation. This course is taught via HITS interactive television with participation of students and faculty throughout the UH system. (1 hour lecture).

Recommended Preparation: Grade of “C” or better in ENG 21 or higher, and MATH 24.

OCN 201  Science of the Sea

An introductory course to oceanography covering the dimensions of the science of oceanography, the physical and chemical properties of sea water, waves, tides, currents, life in the ocean, and the geologic structure of the ocean floor, environmental concerns, and human use of the oceans. (3 hours lecture).

DP

 

Pacific Islands Studies

PACS 108  Pacific Worlds: An Introduction to Pacific Islands Studies

This course situates Hawaiʻi in the larger context of Oceania and exposes students to issues, themes, values, and practices across the region. It also introduces students to the geography, societies, histories, cultures, and arts of Oceania, including Hawai`i. This course combines lecture and discussion that emphasize Pacific Islander perspectives and experiences. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Recommended Preparation: none

DS

 

Pharmacology

PHRM 203  General Pharmacology

Covers a wide range of drugs with emphasis on sites and mechanism of action, toxicity, fate and uses of major therapeutic agents. This course is intended for students in nursing and allied health fields. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in ZOOL 141 and ZOOL 142.

Recommended Preparation: College level chemistry.

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Philosophy

PHIL 100  Introduction to Philosophy: Survey of Problems

Great philosophical issues, theories, and controversies. Course will focus on issues such as the problem of determinism, the problem of induction, the problem of distributive justice, the problem of the highest good, and the problem of the function of government. (3 hours lecture).

DH

PHIL 101  Introduction to Philosophy: Morals and Society

Social and individual values, obligations, rights, and responsibilities. Course will cover normative theories and their applications to business, medicine, ethics and sexual relations. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: College level reading ability.

DH

PHIL 110  Introduction to Logic

A study of the foundations and development of rational thought and communication and their applications. Includes analysis of deductive reasoning, formal and informal fallacies, and the use of symbolic systems. (3 hours lecture).

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PHIL 211  Ancient Philosophy

The philosophical traditions of Greece and Rome between the 5th century BCE and the 5th century CE. Important works by four representative figures (two from Classical Greece and two from the Roman tradition). (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: Completion of ENG 100 or equivalent.

DH

 

Physics

PHYS 151  College Physics I

A noncalculus one semester course for preprofessionaI or nonengineering majors. Study of the basic concepts of physics, including the fundamental principles and theories in mechanics, energy, and waves. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in MATH 140 or higher, or consent of instructor.

Co-requisite(s): PHYS 151L.

DP

PHYS 151L  College Physics Laboratory I

Experiments in statics, mechanics, energy, waves, and friction. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in PHYS 151.

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PHYS 272  General Physics II

This is the second in a rigorous, calculus-based physics course for the professional or engineering major. The study of the concepts of physics including the fundamental principles and theories of electricity, magnetism, light, and optical theory. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for MATH 206 or higher or equivalent and a grade of “C” or better in PHYS 170 or consent of instructor.

Co-requisite(s): PHYS 272L.

DP

PHYS 272L  General Physics II Laboratory

This laboratory course is a rigorous, calculus-based study for professional or engineering majors. Laboratory exercises are designed to reinforce the fundamental concepts of electricity, magnetism, light and optical theory. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in PHYS 272.

DY

 

Political Science

POLS 110  Introduction to Political Science

Introduction to politics as a human activity. Discusses theories, ideologies, systems, and processes of politics. (3 hours lecture).

DS

POLS 120  Introduction to World Politics

Power economics and world politics from cross-national perspectives. Discussion of U.S. foreign policy since 1945. (3 hours lecture).

DS

POLS 130  Introduction to American Government

Focus on American politics and government on the basis of tradition and continuity. Covers: overview of constitutional development, institutions, processes, and participants of the American political system and alternative interpretations. (3 hours lecture).

DS

POLS 180  Introduction to Hawaiian Politics

Introduction to the study of political institutions, processes, and issues in Hawai‘i. (3 hours lecture).

DS

 

Psychology

PSY 100  Survey of Psychology

An introductory course with emphasis on principles of human behavior. Topics covered include motivation, learning, perception, emotion, development, personality, states of consciousness, group processes, problem solving and thinking, and methods of inquiry. (3 hours lecture).

DS

PSY 170  Psychology of Adjustment

Focus is on understanding, evaluating and improving adjustment. Includes study of theories, concepts and techniques concerning personal growth and behavior change. (3 hours lecture).

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PSY 224  Abnormal Psychology

Concepts and principles used in clinical practice: dynamics, diagnosis, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Compares and contrasts the different patterns of abnormal behavior. Examines the differences in theoretical models for understanding maladaptive behavior. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: PSY 100.

DS

PSY 240  Developmental Psychology

This course examines the emotional, mental, physical, and social development of individuals from infancy to adulthood with special attention to interests abilities and critical issues at successive developmental stages. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for PSY 100 or consent of instructor.

DS

PSY 250  Social Psychology

This course will provide students with an understanding of the relationship of social roles on human behaviors and how interpersonal relationships, attribution theories, attitudes, group behaviors, and stereotypes affect human behaviors. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Grade of “C” or better in PSY 100.

DS

 

Religion

REL 150  Introduction to World's Major Religions

Introduction to the world’s major religions: Primitive, Hinduism, Buddhism, Shinto, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Field trips may be required outside class time. (3 hours lecture).

FGC

REL 201  Understanding the New Testament

Analysis of the origin and development of the early Christian message as set forth in the New Testament. Special attention will be given to the message of Jesus and Paul and its relevance to the modern world. (3 hours lecture).

DH

REL 205  Understanding Hawaiian Religion

Major Hawaiian religious teachings and practices from ancient times to the present. Investigation of cultural influence of Hawaiian religious beliefs; analysis of religious texts and relation to other traditions. This course may be applied to the B.A. language/culture core requirements at UH at Mānoa. (3 hours lecture).

DH

REL 207  Understanding Buddhism

Survey of major forms and practices of Buddhism. (3 hours lecture).

Recommended Preparation: ENG 100 and either REL 150 or REL 151.

DH

 

Social Sciences

SSCI 193  Cooperative Arts and Science Education (CASE)

A workstudy course providing opportunities to reinforce skills learned in the Social Science areas and to apply those skills in actual job situations. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree.

Pre-requisite(s): Minimum of 12 credit hours of general curricula.

SSCI 200  Social Science Research Methods

Focus on various ways social scientists undertake research. The course introduces the student to decision making with statistics research design methods and computers to assist analysis. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Successful completion of one social science course at 100 level, and placement in MATH 24 or consent of instructor.

DS

SSCI 293  Cooperative Arts and Science Education

A work-study course providing opportunities to upgrade and diversify knowledge and skills learned in the behavioral and social sciences, and to apply these in job situations. (Practicum)

Pre-requisite(s): SSCI 193V.

 

Social Work

SW 200  The Field of Social Work

Orientation to the profession of social work; the nature and scope of social work, historical development, values and philosophy, methods of practice, scope, and aims. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): ENG 22 or Placement in ENG 100

Elect

 

Sociology

SOC 100  Survey of General Sociology

This course is an introduction to the scientific discipline of sociology. It will focus on key concepts, main theoretical perspectives, and research findings used by sociologists to explain the social world and social interaction. The course examines the fundamental components and institutions that makeup the structure of human societies as well as the basic processes and direction of social change. (3 hours lecture).

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SOC 251  Introduction to Sociology of the Family

SOC 251 is the study of human relationships within courtship, marriage, and the family as influenced by culture and society. It is designed to challenge students to re-examine assumptions regarding behavior, decisions, choices, and motivations in interpersonal relationships. The course places particular emphasis on diverse family forms, and the changing nature of how we define family. (3 hours lecture).

DS

 

Spanish Language

SPAN 101  Beginning Spanish I

Introduction to basic structures of the Spanish language emphasizing speaking, writing, listening and reading. Oral communication emphasized to provide students with the right pronunciation vocabulary and the control of basic grammar. Introduction to Hispanic culture. (4 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory).

SPAN 102  Beginning Spanish II

Continues SPAN 101 through reading, speaking, writing and listening. Oral communication emphasized. Utilizes videos, stories and songs. Deals with Hispanic culture and the basic knowledge of the history, geography, and the traditions of Spanish speaking countries. (4 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for SPAN 101 or consent of instructor.

 

Speech

SP 151  Personal and Public Speech

Introduction to major elements of speech. Enables students to acquire competence in two person, small group, and public situations. Models and concepts are used to explain the speech act. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Placement in ENG 21 or higher.

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SP 181  Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

Introduction to basic principles of interaction between two people. Emphasis is on enhancement of skills in a variety of interpersonal contexts. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Placement in ENG 21 or higher.

OC

SP 231  Performance of Literature

Introduction to the study of literature through performance. Practice in rhetorical and literary analysis culminating in and performance of literary selections for an audience. The nature of performance criticism. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ENG 100 or SP 151.

OC DA

SP 251  Principles of Effective Speaking

Theory and practice of public speaking. Emphasizes practical skills in communicating with today’s audiences, planning, and delivering speeches. (Offered occasionally) (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ENG 100 or SP 151.

OC DA

 

Theatre

THEA 101  Introduction to Drama and Theatre

An introduction to the art of drama and theatre. Students study selected plays that are representative of important playwrights and historical periods. These plays are studied in their historical context and provide a basis for understanding elements and styles of drama. Theatre production will also be explored by considering the functions of actors, audiences, designers, playwrights and technicians. (3 hours lecture).

DA

THEA 221  Acting I

Performance course concentrating on voice, relaxation, body awareness, and freedom from self-consciousness through theatre games, improvisation, and exercises. Emphasis on ensemble work. Students must see two plays and write about them or use the Service-Learning option. (3 hours lecture).

DA

THEA 222  Acting II

Performance course concentrating on exploration of character creation; continued work on voice, relaxation, and self-realization. Students must see two plays and write about them or use the Service-Learning option. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for THEA 221.

DA

THEA 260  Dramatic Production

Introduction to the process of converting a play into a performance. Students are required to participate in at least two aspects of an actual production. Six credits may be applied to the AA degree. (3 hours lecture).

DA

THEA 296  Special Topics in Theatre

Students will investigate important topics in Theatre Studies such as specific artists/practitioners, genres, or methods of training. Specific course information will be made available in the schedule of classes. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): "C" or better in THEA 101 or "C" or better in THEA 221

Elect

 

Women's Studies

WS 151  Introduction to Women's Studies

This interdisciplinary introductory course looks at gender roles and relationships, historically and in contemporary societies. The course examines the social, cultural, historical, and political influences on the status of women. It presents women’s experiences from diverse backgrounds, social structures, and cultures. (3 hours lecture).

DS

 

Zoology

ZOOL 141  Human Anatomy and Physiology I

The first semester of a two-semester course in human anatomy and physiology which includes a study of human embryology, gross anatomy, microanatomy, physiology, pathology, and homeostatic relationships. This course is intended for students entering health care or medically related fields such as nursing, physical therapy and medical technology. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): High school chemistry or equivalent preparation or consent of instructor.

Recommended Preparation: High school biology, BIOL 100, BIOL 101 or ZOOL 101; registration in ZOOL 141L.

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ZOOL 141L  Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab I

Laboratory to accompany ZOOL 141. Reinforces the facts and concepts of human anatomy and physiology discussed in ZOOL 141 through dissections, examination of models, laboratory activities, and other hands-on experiences. This course is intended for students entering health care or medically related fields such as nursing, physical therapy and medical technology. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in ZOOL 141 or equivalent preparation or consent of instructor.

DY

ZOOL 142  Human Anatomy and Physiology II

The second semester of a two-semester course in human anatomy and physiology which includes a study of human embryology, gross anatomy, microanatomy, physiology, pathology, and homeostatic relationships. This course is intended for students entering health care or medically related fields such as nursing, physical therapy and medical technology. (3 hours lecture).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for ZOOL 141 or equivalent preparation or instructor's consent.

Recommended Preparation: Registration in ZOOL 142L.

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ZOOL 142L  Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab II

Laboratory to accompany ZOOL 142. Reinforces the facts and concepts of human anatomy and physiology discussed in ZOOL 142 through dissections, examination of models, laboratory activities, and other hands-on experiences. This course is intended for students entering health care or medically related fields such as nursing, physical therapy and medical technology. (3 hours laboratory).

Pre-requisite(s): Credit for or registration in ZOOL 142 or equivalent preparation or consent of instructor.

DY